The lack of cybersecurity in mobile applications meant to assist dementia patients and their caregivers could put patients' personal health information at risk, according to researchers at McLean Hospitals in Belmont, Massachusetts, and clinicians at Harvard Medical School. A study in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry examines app security policies and provides recommendations.

Virtual visits by neurologists save patients the hassle of travel, but some question such remote meetings as effective as in-person visits. A study published in Neurology examines the feasibility of virtual house calls by neurologist in treating those with Parkinson’s disease.

A noninvasive eye scan, developed by neuroscience investigators at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, detects Alzheimer’s disease years before symptoms arise by analyzing the amyloid-beta deposits in the retina. The study, published in JCI Insight, outlined how the scan improves current detection methods with high accuracy.

E-visits allow for patients and providers to come together without the travel or waiting room times, but whether these visits are as effective or have other benefits is unknown. In a study conducted by the Wisconsin School of Business, researchers found e-visits promote more appointments to primary care physicians.

Smartphones and teenagers go hand-in-hand, but in the event of a concussion, patients are not advised to use mobile devices. In a report published in Brain Injury, researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center showed teenagers using a mobile health application once a day with medical care improved concussion symptoms.