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Analytics & Quality

 

Researchers from Cedars-Sinai have been able to extract primary concerns patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have about their biologic medications through social media posts. Findings were published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, the official journal of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.

With 35 million Americans admitted to the hospital every year, it’s important they feel comfortable in their surroundings. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Health Environments Research and Design, patients discussed what could be improved upon in hospital rooms.

Tuning into SpongeBob could be one method to reduce the number of anesthesia doses to children with cancer. A study, presented at the ESTRO 36 conference in Vienna, found projecting videos on the inside of a radiotherapy machine during treatment could be a less traumatic, more cost-efficient method of managing pain for these patients.

Searching symptoms online could impact how much patients trust professional diagnoses. A study, set to be presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco, analyzes how patients receiving health information online can lead to more skepticism when it comes to a physician's diagnosis. 

Spok, a healthcare communications organization, has released a pair of annual surveys on mobility strategies in healthcare. The surveys include responses from more than 300 U.S. healthcare professionals covering mobile strategy development, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies, communications infrastructure and improving mobile communications.

 

Recent Headlines

Shut it! Keeping OR door closed reduces infections

Preventing surgical site infections could be as easy as shutting the door. Researchers testing air quality in operating rooms (ORs) found that repeatedly opening and closing the OR door increased particle distributions and the risk of contamination.

Paper test strip allows heart failure patients to monitor disease at home

The nearly six million people living with heart failure face a life of monitoring the disease in the event it worsens. This often involves traveling to a physician on a routine basis, but scientists have opened an avenue to in-home monitoring with a simple paper test strip.

Leaf Healthcare introduces monitoring devices tailored to hospital patients

Monitoring hospital patients requires more than what conventional fitness trackers can offer. Leaf Healthcare unveiled a comprehensive mobility monitoring system at the American Association of Critical Care Nurses' National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition in Houston.

Top 5 concerns inflammatory bowel disease patients post on social media

Researchers from Cedars-Sinai have been able to extract primary concerns patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have about their biologic medications through social media posts. Findings were published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, the official journal of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.

Email provides new tool to help smokers quit

Smoking cessation can be a daunting task for many smokers—but help could be found in your email inbox. An American Cancer Society study, published in Tobacco Control, found personalized and frequent emails were as effective in helping patients quit smoking as many leading medications. 

Safety testing could prevent adverse drug reactions, reduce costs

Testing new medications can be risky, especially without an effective monitoring program. A study, published in Medical Care, evaluated the impact drug safety monitoring could have on detecting unsafe medications, improving patient care and controlling medical costs.

AI 94% accurate in detecting diabetic retinopathy

Some 45 percent of those with diabetes experience retinopathy, which can cause blindness if not detected early. Researchers from the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University have published a study in Ophthalmology detailing how artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning helped create an algorithm to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR).

Weight a minute: Bathroom scales detect arteriosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmia

Stepping on the scale could one day revel more than just weight. Researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Institute of Biomedical Engineering in Lithuania have developed a multifunctional scale that could detect conditions such as arteriosclerosis or cardiac arrhythmia.

Physician burnout linked to environment, stress, taking work home

Increasing rates of physician burnout are negative affecting providers as well as patients. Researchers in JAMA Internal Medicine explored exactly why physicians feel burned out—with leading causes including excessive workloads, stressful environments and a lacking work-life balance.

Top 6 things patients want in their hospital room

With 35 million Americans admitted to the hospital every year, it’s important they feel comfortable in their surroundings. In a recent study, published in the Journal of Health Environments Research and Design, patients discussed what could be improved upon in hospital rooms.

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