You are here

Analytics & Quality

 

Accurate results on A1c blood sugar tests are crucial for patients to monitor and treat themselves accordingly. Researchers, whose work was published Feb 7, 2017, in the Journal of the American Medical Association, examined data from two large studies to determine if a difference in A1c levels in African American patients with sickle cell trait.

 

 

The rapid adoption of electronic medical records and cheapening computing power opened the floodgates for health data, creating a wealth of new sources and applications. A roundtable discussion at HIMSS17—led by James B. Golden, PhD, of PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PWC)— aims to investigate how this new emphasis on data can benefit patients.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) has developed a set of guidelines for promoting family-centered care in intensive care units to lessen the effects of post-intensive care syndrome.

In an effort to better dispense insulin to diabetics, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are developing a “smart” patch that will monitor blood glucose and release insulin when levels increase.

A new study, published in PAIN, has found that patients with substance abuse disorders and other psychiatric conditions are more likely to use opioid pain medications for longer terms.

 

Recent Headlines

Continuous glucose monitoring effective with or without blood glucose monitoring measurement

In patients with Type 1 diabetes, having correct glucose levels is the first step in high quality care. A recent study, published in Diabetes Care, tested the effectiveness in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) with and without blood glucose monitoring (BGM) measurement. 

Barriers to utilizing diabetes devices

With the growing number of diabetes devices on the market, including insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors, patients are taking control of their diabetes. Just how interested patients are and what barriers these devices must overcome to reach patients is unknown. A recent study, published in Diabetes Care, identifies the barriers diabetes devices face and which patients use them.

Monitoring physical activity gives patients a pep in their step

Maintaining a level of physical activity is key in not only preventing the rise of obesity but also many chronic diseases. A recent study led by researcher from the American Cancer Society, and published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, showed that continuously assessments of physical activity during visits to the physician could lower rates of chronic diseases.

Computer predicts leukemia remission with 90% accuracy

Researchers have developed a computer learning algorithm capable of predicting remission rates for patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Patient engagement reduces readmission from chronic conditions

West Virginia's Charleston Area Medical Center (CAMC), after its implementation of the patient engagement and education system SmarTigr, has reduced readmission of patients with chronic conditions such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

A photo a day keeps the doctor away

An image tells a thousand word—but it also can treat older patients in rural communities. Kathy Rush, professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Okanagan, conducted a study testing how photographs can improve the treatment of elderly rural patients with arterial fibrillation. 

Hemoglobin test results differ in African Americans with sickle cell

Accurate results on A1c blood sugar tests are crucial for patients to monitor and treat themselves accordingly. Researchers, whose work was published Feb 7, 2017, in the Journal of the American Medical Association, examined data from two large studies to determine if a difference in A1c levels in African American patients with sickle cell trait.

 

 

Baebies receives FDA clearance for newborn screening

Baebies, producers of newborn screening and pediatric testing, has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for SEEKER, a quantitative measuring tool of dried blood samples.

Patients who keep up with primary care avoid hospital stays

For older individuals, a visit to the physician can reduce the possibility for a hospital stay down the road. A study, published in The BMJ, analyzes the correlation between continuity of care with primary care physicians and related hospital admissions for older patients.

Online reviews increase physician stress

Just like online reviews for the coffee shop around the corner, patients are rating physicians on both independent and health system websites. A study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer, examines how these rating systems effect physician stress levels and how both parties view the online review process.

Pages