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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first digital pill with an ingestion tracking system to tell physicians whether patients have taken their medication.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania believe reviewing the social media of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could lead to the formation of improved treatments. Findings were published in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a mathematical model capable of predicting how cancer patients will react to certain immunotherapies. Findings are explained in a study published in Nature.

As the number of individuals with type 2 diabetes increases, researchers search for a way to prevent or slow the progression of diabetes in at-risk patients. According to a study published in JMIR Diabetes, an artificial intelligence (AI) coaching platform could improve habits to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Patients increasingly using the internet to research providers beforehand, according to the 2017 Patient Access Journey Report conducted by Kyruus.

 

Recent Headlines

Bionic pancreas decreases stress, improves treatment satisfaction in type 1 diabetes patients

Patients with type 1 diabetes experienced higher levels of treatment satisfaction and lower distress levels when using a bionic pancreas (BP), according to a study published by Mary Ann Liebert.

Social media big data could provide information on fighting prescription drug addiction

Researchers from Dartmouth, Stanford University and IBM Research have conducted a review of literature to evaluate the feasibility of using social media data to identify behavioral patterns of prescription drug abuse. Findings are published in Journal of Medical Internet Research.

FDA approves digital pill capable of tracking medication digestion

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first digital pill with an ingestion tracking system to tell physicians whether patients have taken their medication.

Wrist wearable uses pulses to relieve chronic motion sickness

Chronic motion sickness patients could be helped by the Reliefband, a wearable that uses pulses to block signals entering the part of the brain related to nausea. 

Researchers use Twitter to collect data on ADHD

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania believe reviewing the social media of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could lead to the formation of improved treatments. Findings were published in the Journal of Attention Disorders.

Researchers develop mathematical prediction model for immunotherapy success

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a mathematical model capable of predicting how cancer patients will react to certain immunotherapies. Findings are explained in a study published in Nature.

AI coaching app assists at-risk patients in preventing type 2 diabetes

As the number of individuals with type 2 diabetes increases, researchers search for a way to prevent or slow the progression of diabetes in at-risk patients. According to a study published in JMIR Diabetes, an artificial intelligence (AI) coaching platform could improve habits to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

13 critical findings on digital health advancements

Digital healthcare technology in the form of mobile applications and wearables has improved patient care and proven to be effective tools in self-management, according to a report released by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science.

6 key points on consumers searching the internet for providers

Patients increasingly using the internet to research providers beforehand, according to the 2017 Patient Access Journey Report conducted by Kyruus.

VR reduces pain, anxiety in pediatric patients

Researchers from the at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found virtual reality (VR) an effective tool in pediatric pain management during blood draws, according to a study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology.

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