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Clinical Practice

 

A review of 21 studies including more than 20,000 women found a 25 percent improved rate of patient outcomes in women participating in obstetrics and gynecology clinical trial when compared to those not participating.

A study, published in The Journal of Aging and Health, examines the impact digital health and coaching have on engagement of patients at risk of developing diabetes.

Chronic wounds cost the United States' healthcare system $20 billion a year. A team of researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have developed a new skin-graft harvesting system to cut costs and improve patient outcomes.

Do today’s hospitals need humanoid robots greeting visitors, escorting them around the hospital and sensing whether they’re feeling joy, anger or fear? Should nurses try more low-tech, back-to-basics steps to reduce infusion pump errors? Do staff need better systems for deciding which cleaning solution to use on each piece of medical equipment?

Playing games, making crafts and hanging out with friends can decrease the risks of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease. A new study, published in JAMA Neurology, delves deeper into the association of neurocognitive function and mentally stimulating activities.

 

Recent Headlines

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system advances robotic surgery

Surgeons may have a new competitor in the recently developed biocompatible near-infrared 3D tracking system used in the first smart tissue autonomous robot (STAR) surgery. The system improves upon current manual and robot-assisted surgeries with advanced 3D visibility and accuracy. 

Participation in clinical trials improves women's health outcomes

A review of 21 studies including more than 20,000 women found a 25 percent improved rate of patient outcomes in women participating in obstetrics and gynecology clinical trial when compared to those not participating.

Kidney device paves way for improved screening

Researchers at State University of New York at Binghamton have developed a model kidney to show the inner working of the organ during different treatments to identify possible new solutions.

Organs-on-chips could make difference in drug screening

Researchers, led by University of California, Irvine professor Christopher C.W. Hughes, have developed multiple vascularized organs on a 96-well plate. These tissues give researchers a look at how the flow of blood through the vascular system deliver nutrients to the entire body. 

3D spheres help simulate body's reaction to TB

A team of infection researchers and bioinformaticians from the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom have developed a 3D system of spheres to gain insight on how the body reacts to tuberculosis (TB).

Digital health keeps patients at risk for diabetes on track

A study, published in The Journal of Aging and Health, examines the impact digital health and coaching have on engagement of patients at risk of developing diabetes.

Method in grafting chronic wounds improves healing, reduces cost

Chronic wounds cost the United States' healthcare system $20 billion a year. A team of researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have developed a new skin-graft harvesting system to cut costs and improve patient outcomes.

Wait, wait? Three factors that extend patients' visit times

Long wait times affect care outcomes, whether they result from a full waiting room, understaffing or poor time management. A study, published in BMJ Open, examined the top three factors that impact patient wait times and how to improve clinical workflow.

Investigations & innovations: ECRI Institute watch list includes low-tech solutions, high-tech ideas

Do today’s hospitals need humanoid robots greeting visitors, escorting them around the hospital and sensing whether they’re feeling joy, anger or fear? Should nurses try more low-tech, back-to-basics steps to reduce infusion pump errors? Do staff need better systems for deciding which cleaning solution to use on each piece of medical equipment?

Can brain games help sharpen the aging mind?

Playing games, making crafts and hanging out with friends can decrease the risks of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease. A new study, published in JAMA Neurology, delves deeper into the association of neurocognitive function and mentally stimulating activities.

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