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Clinical Practice

 

Researchers from the University of Warwick have developed a machine learning model capable of predicting the interactions between proteins and drug molecules with 99 percent accuracy. Findings have been published in Science Advances.

Belgian researchers have identified a protein formulation that mimics the structure and rigidity of the natural lining in a women’s ovaries, a breakthrough for women with infertility or cancer patients who had radiation or chemotherapy treatments. Findings are published in the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota used 3D printing to build lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the look, structure, mechanical properties and feel of human organs. Findings were published in Advanced Materials Technologies.

Elderly patients who played 3D-platform games such as Nintendo's Super Mario 64 saw improvements in short-term memory and an increase in gray matter in the brain, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

A video game that promotes balance by instructing users to hold poses could help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

 

Recent Headlines

Machine learning can predict individuals at risk of suicide

Analyzing brain patterns with machine learning could predict people at risk of suicide, according to a study published in Nature Human Behavior.

Paraplegics use virtual reality to reduce phantom pain

Scientists at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland have demonstrated that phantom body pain in paraplegic patients could be reduced by creating a bodily illusion using virtual reality (VR), according to a study published Neurology.

AI monitors, determines age of preterm infant brain

Researchers from the University of Helsinki and the Helsinki University Hospital have developed artificial intelligence (AI) software capable of measuring EEG signals in preterm infants to estimate the brain's functional maturity, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

AI endoscopic system IDs colorectal polyps

Researchers have developed an endoscopic system, powered by artificial intelligence (AI), capable of identifying colorectal adenomas during a colonoscopy. Findings are set to be presented at the 25th UEG Week in Barcelona.

Smart nanoparticles regulate body temperature, treat cancer

Scientist from the University of Surrey in the U.K. and China's Dalian University of Technology have developed smart nanoparticles capable of killing cancer cells and self-regulating heat to protect healthy tissue, according to a study published in Nanoscale.

ZEISS releases new live cell imaging platform

ZEISS has introduced a microscopy system called ZEISS Celldiscoverer 7, the latest technology for live cell imaging by the Germany-based imaging company.  

Machine learning tool aids radiologists in IDing cancerous breast lesions

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and breast imaging experts at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a machine learning tool capable of identifying high-risk breast lesions that are likely to become cancerous. The tool aims to reduce the amount of unnecessary surgeries in patients with low-risk lesions.

Surgical glue closes wounds in 60 seconds, can be programmed to stay sealed for months

Biomedical engineers from the University of Sydney and the United States have developed an elastic and adhesive surgical glue capable of sealing wounds in 60 seconds. Finding are explained in Science Translational Medicine.

Smart bandages heal faster, better

Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have developed a "smart" bandage the could heal wound three times faster than conventional bandages. The bandage, which is activated by a wireless device, is explained in Advanced Functional Materials.

'Body-on-a-chip' system improves testing of new medications

Scientists from Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have developed a "body-on-a-chip," composed of micro-organs, for improved testing of new drugs. The micro-organ system is described in Scientific Reports.

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