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Clinical Practice

 

Researchers from the University of Warwick have developed a machine learning model capable of predicting the interactions between proteins and drug molecules with 99 percent accuracy. Findings have been published in Science Advances.

Belgian researchers have identified a protein formulation that mimics the structure and rigidity of the natural lining in a women’s ovaries, a breakthrough for women with infertility or cancer patients who had radiation or chemotherapy treatments. Findings are published in the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota used 3D printing to build lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the look, structure, mechanical properties and feel of human organs. Findings were published in Advanced Materials Technologies.

Elderly patients who played 3D-platform games such as Nintendo's Super Mario 64 saw improvements in short-term memory and an increase in gray matter in the brain, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

A video game that promotes balance by instructing users to hold poses could help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

 

Recent Headlines

Robot evaluates brain cells faster, more accurately

Researchers, led by Simon Schultz and Luca Annecchino at Imperial College London, have developed a new method of whole-cell recording (WCR) to record electrical currents in the brain.

Brain-computer interface improves motor function in stroke patients

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have developed a brain-computer interface (BCI) capable of improving motor function in stroke patients. Findings were published in Royal Society Open Science.

Novartis launches study using smartphone app on MS

Novartis, producers of innovative healthcare solutions, has announced the launch of its elevateMS study. The study aims to utilize a mobile application for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to collect sensor-based data to improve research.

3D AR improved facial reconstructive results

Plastic surgery researchers have utilized augmented reality (AR) to create 3D simulations in facial reconstructive surgery. The study, published in the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery-Global Open, examined the benefits of using the AR system during plastic surgery.

Brain-computer interface, virtual avatar promote movement in brain

Researchers from the University of Houston have completed a study using a brain-computer interface paired with a virtual avatar to control gait to assist patients recovering the ability to walk after a stroke and other impairments. The study, published in Scientific Reports, aimed to further development of brain-computer interfaces.

Near-infrared light identifies patients at risk for heart attack, stroke

Identifying high-risk heart attack and stroke patients allows physicians to administer early treatment to prevent serious events, but current methods are unable to pinpoint some symptoms. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers outlined how near-infrared light can identify high-risk arterial plaques.

3D-printing method produces living tissue for regenerative medicine

Researchers from the University of Oxford have developed a new 3D-printing method to improve how laboratory-grown cells form living structures. Explained in Scientific Reports, the new method aims to change regenerative medicine by producing complex tissues and cartilage capable of supporting or repairing damaged areas in the body.

Intensified oral therapies may lower lipid levels; simulation shows gap between guidelines, actual practice

Controlling lipid levels in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) can be improved with oral-only lipid lowering treatments, according to new research. A simulation study showed that 99.3 percent of patients could achieve low-density lipid (LDL) levels below 70 mg/dL with maximal intensification.

Researchers utilize 3D printing to produce “lab on chip” devices

Microfluidic “lab on a chip” devices and 3D printing are being paired together by researchers at Brigham Young University. The team wanted to improve the effectiveness of such devices, which can be less than 100 micrometers. A report from Lab on a Chip outlined how the technology can better identify disease biomarkers.

Robots improve postop outcomes after esophageal surgery

Robotic surgeries could be the way of the future according to researchers at Allina Health. In a recent study published in Diseases of the Esophagus, researchers tested the safety and effectiveness of robotic assisted transhiatal esophagectomy (RATE) on patients.

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