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Clinical Practice

 

Researchers from the University of Warwick have developed a machine learning model capable of predicting the interactions between proteins and drug molecules with 99 percent accuracy. Findings have been published in Science Advances.

Belgian researchers have identified a protein formulation that mimics the structure and rigidity of the natural lining in a women’s ovaries, a breakthrough for women with infertility or cancer patients who had radiation or chemotherapy treatments. Findings are published in the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota used 3D printing to build lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the look, structure, mechanical properties and feel of human organs. Findings were published in Advanced Materials Technologies.

Elderly patients who played 3D-platform games such as Nintendo's Super Mario 64 saw improvements in short-term memory and an increase in gray matter in the brain, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

A video game that promotes balance by instructing users to hold poses could help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

 

Recent Headlines

Nanotechnology test identifies Zika in minutes

Detecting Zika currently requires blood samples to be refrigerated and shipped to a laboratory for tests, delaying treatment and care to those in rural areas. Researchers from Washington University published a study in Advanced Biosystems that details a new technology capable of delivering Zika test results in minutes.

Smartphone spectrometer detects diseases as accurately as lab equipment

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have utilized smartphone technology to develop a spectral transmission-reflectance-intensity (TRI) analyzer. The technology attaches to a smartphone and can analyze samples of blood, urine and saliva just as well as clinical instruments.

Video games can reduce gray matter in hippocampus

Playing video game can reduce the amount of gray matter in the hippocampus region of the brain by using spatial learning, navigation and memory. In a study published in Molecular Psychiatry, researchers evaluated which types of games affect the brain.

Device repurposes cells, healing organs without additional treatment

Described in the recent issue of Nature Nanotechnology, a technology called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT) technology has shown an ability to transform skin cells into other types of cells with 98 percent accuracy, with the potential ability to save failing organs.

Watson AI provides comprehensive, personalized cancer reports

IBM's artificial intelligence platform Watson is being trained to help cancer patients receive more personalized care by identifying the specific genetic mutations causing their disease. With Watson's reports, healthcare providers will be able to develop and administer therapies to directly treat each patient.

Brain implant delivers ultrasonic waves to brain treating cancer, Alzheimer’s

A recent study published in Advanced Healthcare Materials outlines a new ceramic skull implant capable of delivering ultrasound treatments.

Reducing brain injury, sensory damage following cardiac arrest

Those who have experienced cardiac arrest face long-term health effects related to brain activity. Recent research examined the impact of such events, including the deprivation of oxygen to the brain, and subsequent resuscitation efforts.

Non-invasive technology predicts onset of asthma attacks

Predicting the onset of an asthma attack by identifying symptoms early could improve outcomes in children with high risk asthma. Researchers have evaluated a new non-invasive technological approach to analyze lung sounds in young patients to hopefully predict the onset of an attack. Findings are published in Respirology.

Philips wearable blue light device relieves psoriasis symptoms in 84% of users

Royal Philips has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its wearable therapy device, BlueControl, to treat people with mild psoriasis. Philips aims to assist people in easily treating their psoriasis with a wearable device that can be used at home.

Pulse rate monitoring before C-section can reduce need for medication

Expectant mothers undergoing a Caesarean section are often prescribed preventative medications to maintain blood pressure. But these medications come with side effects for both the mother and newborn. In a study, published in Annals of Biomedical Engineering, researchers evaluated pulse rate monitoring in identifying mothers who would not need medication and reduce side effects.

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