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Clinical Practice

 

Scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a set of guidelines to combat fatigue in emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in order to reduce medical errors and risk of injury.

Researchers at the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in Bethesda, Maryland, have developed a biochemical formula using mineralized compounds capable of regulating the blood sugar of type 2 diabetes for multiple days in mice. Findings are published in Nature Communications.

Researchers led by Minoru Hashimoto, a professor of textile science and technology at Shinshu University in Japan, have developed a wearable robot capable of supporting the hip joint while a patient is walking. The prototype design, which is described as a wearable actuator, is described in an article published in Smart Materials and Structures.

Researchers from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have completed the first human trials using a gas-sensing swallowable capsule. The team made two separate discoveries that could improve research into gastrointestinal disorders. Findings are published in Nature Electronics.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed an algorithm for cancer patients receiving radiotherapy that could reduce side effects while maintaining efficacy. Findings were published in Physics in Medicine & Biology.

 

Recent Headlines

Microscopic needle patch burns fat in mice

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the University of North Carolina have developed a medicated skin patch capable of transforming white fat into energy burning brown fat. The study, published in ACS Nano, aimed for the patch to treat metabolic disorders like obesity and diabetes.

Artificial skin gives robotic hand a sense of touch

Researchers from the University of Houston have developed an artificial skin, capable of stretching over robotic hands and sense the difference between hot and cold. Findings are published in Science Advances.

Online insomnia therapy reduces paranoia, hallucinations

Not getting enough sleep is a common occurrence for college students—but those with insomnia could experience reduced paranoia and hallucinations with digital cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry. 

Clinical trials often go unregistered, unpublished

Clinical trials often go unregistered or unpublished and have differences in the reporting of primary outcomes, according to a study published in JAMA.

3D device gives clinicians a peek at how cancer spreads

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Michigan Engineering have developed a tiny device capable of providing clinicians with a comprehensive view into how cancer spreads.

Researchers improve blood test to detect early pancreatic cancer

A recent study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, outlines an improved blood test capable of detecting pancreatic cancer earlier than current methods.

Diagnostic tool IDs Parkinson's in earliest stages

Researchers from RMIT University have developed a diagnostic software tool capable of identifying patients with early Parkinson’s disease—before physical symptoms appear. The tool aims to provide patients and providers with the ability to treat Parkinson’s more effectively by addressing the disease in its earliest state.

Camera tracks endoscope position within the body

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt University in Scotland have developed a camera capable of seeing through the human body. The tool detects light from inside the body to locate and track surgical instruments.

Protein discovery could treat obesity, diabetes

Researchers, led by Suresh Alahari, PhD, Fred Brazda Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, have brought the fight against obesity and diabetes to the cellular level with a study outlining the potential of the Nischarin protein.

Robot evaluates brain cells faster, more accurately

Researchers, led by Simon Schultz and Luca Annecchino at Imperial College London, have developed a new method of whole-cell recording (WCR) to record electrical currents in the brain.

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