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Clinical Practice

 

Scientists from NUST MISIS have developed “living bandages” created from nanofibers that are capable of accelerating the regeneration of damaged tissue. Findings are published in Applied Surface Science.

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed and tested an organ-on-a-chip showing how pathogens like hepatitis B interact with artificial human organs. Findings were published in Nature Communications.

Researchers have developed a list of recommended changes to international guidelines for the development of clinical trials to gain insights on the impact of treatment on participants and their quality of life. Finding were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Health) have found using a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD) with additional staff education could reduce contaminated blood cultures by four-fold.

Remote patient monitoring may not improve a half-dozen clinical outcomes, according to a study published in Nature Digital Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

Paper sensor patch measures glucose during exercise

Researchers from the State University of New York at Binghamton have developed a non-invasive paper-based sensor patch, capable of measuring blood glucose levels for diabetic patients.

Common molecule arms itself to fight cancer, influenza

Researchers from the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom have developed a genetically engineered common molecule capable of being programmed to fight cancer, influenza and other diseases.

Microscopic needle patch burns fat in mice

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the University of North Carolina have developed a medicated skin patch capable of transforming white fat into energy burning brown fat. The study, published in ACS Nano, aimed for the patch to treat metabolic disorders like obesity and diabetes.

Artificial skin gives robotic hand a sense of touch

Researchers from the University of Houston have developed an artificial skin, capable of stretching over robotic hands and sense the difference between hot and cold. Findings are published in Science Advances.

Online insomnia therapy reduces paranoia, hallucinations

Not getting enough sleep is a common occurrence for college students—but those with insomnia could experience reduced paranoia and hallucinations with digital cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry. 

Clinical trials often go unregistered, unpublished

Clinical trials often go unregistered or unpublished and have differences in the reporting of primary outcomes, according to a study published in JAMA.

3D device gives clinicians a peek at how cancer spreads

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Michigan Engineering have developed a tiny device capable of providing clinicians with a comprehensive view into how cancer spreads.

Researchers improve blood test to detect early pancreatic cancer

A recent study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, outlines an improved blood test capable of detecting pancreatic cancer earlier than current methods.

Diagnostic tool IDs Parkinson's in earliest stages

Researchers from RMIT University have developed a diagnostic software tool capable of identifying patients with early Parkinson’s disease—before physical symptoms appear. The tool aims to provide patients and providers with the ability to treat Parkinson’s more effectively by addressing the disease in its earliest state.

Camera tracks endoscope position within the body

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt University in Scotland have developed a camera capable of seeing through the human body. The tool detects light from inside the body to locate and track surgical instruments.

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