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Mobile & Telehealth

 

Researchers from the Wisconsin Institute of Surgical Outcomes Research found a smartphone app to be a potential tool in detecting surgical site infections (SSI) and preventing additional hospital admissions. Findings were published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Telemonitoring can help manage patients with heart failure, but evaluating its true impact can be difficult. In response, researchers examined previous studies to establish criteria, which were divided into six classes: dimensions: clinical, economic, user perspective, educational, organizational, and technical. Findings were published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

A psychoeducational tool identifies patients at risk for an opioid overdose but fails to motivate them to change their behavior. Findings are published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

A telehealth-based weight loss program utilizing a health coach through video conferencing could result in loss of over 5 percent of initial body weight in six months. Findings are published in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare.

Communication between patient and physician is the foundation in building a close relationship—and cell phones have become the favored tool in clinical communication, according to a study published in European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare.

 

Recent Headlines

Diabetic patients improve glycemic control with One Drop Mobile app

Patients with diabetes were able to decrease their hemoglobin A1c by an average of 1.36 percent using One Drop Mobile applications on iPhones and Apple Watches, according to a study published in JMIR mHealth & uHealth.

FDA clears ECG accessory for Apple Watch

AliveCor, developers of electrocardiogram (ECG) technology, have received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the KardiaBand, an accessory that will allow Apple Watch users to view ECGs at any time.

Intermountain Healthcare introduces telehealth kiosk with partners

Intermountain Healthcare and United Way of Salt Lake, in partnership with Promise South Salt Lake, have introduced a telehealth kiosk at the Columbus Center in Salt Lake City.

Patients likely to be flummoxed by online emergency-radiology resources

Very few online resources aimed at patients who wish to learn about an emergency radiology exam are comprehensible to most of that intended audience, according to a study published online in Emergency Radiology.

Mental health apps improve motivation, confidence in users

Researchers from Brigham Young University have found mental health mobile applications to be feasible self-help tools for improving mental or emotional health, according to a study published in JMIR mHealth.

Multiplayer video game improves rehab in patients recovering from stroke

A multiplayer mobile game that puts physically impaired patients with able-bodied individuals has shown to improve rehabilitation, according to a study published in the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation.

Dermatology diagnoses derived from photos are similar to those made in-office

According to a study conducted by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and published in JAMA Dermatology, parents that send high-quality photos from a smartphone camera of their child’s skin condition to dermatologists could skip the office visits and receive treatment through telehealth.

Text message reminders increase flu vaccination rates

Text message reminders were found to be an effective, low-cost method to increase influenza vaccinations, according to a study published in the Annals of Family Medicine.

St. Louis 'virtual' hospital hopes to make very real improvements in care

The buzzwords related to information technology and advanced communication are familiar—digital, virtual, real-time, eHealth, telemedicine. But sometimes they can be used in a way that’s a bit confusing. For example, a facility outside St. Louis is perhaps the world’s most advanced virtual hospital. But the building is real, the doctors are real, the nurses making rounds are real. It’s just the patients that are missing.

At-home monitoring app could provide better look into patient vision

A mobile application assisting patients with macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy in testing their vision is just as accurate in providing results as in-person office visits, according to a study presented at the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

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