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Mobile & Telehealth

 

According to a study conducted by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and published in JAMA Dermatology, parents that send high-quality photos from a smartphone camera of their child’s skin condition to dermatologists could skip the office visits and receive treatment through telehealth.

A mobile application assisting patients with macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy in testing their vision is just as accurate in providing results as in-person office visits, according to a study presented at the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Researchers from China have developed an online consultation tool accessed through a mobile app that could improve patient-provider relationships, improve self-care for chronic disease patients and lower costs for rheumatic disease patients, according to findings presented at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Individuals struggling with opioid addiction meet their greatest challenge when returning home, where relapse rates are between 40 to 60 percent. In an attempt to slow the opioid epidemic, mental health and substance abuse professionals have utilized teleconsulting to deliver support to patients and families.

Tracking a child’s development is important in ensuring one meets age-related milestones. To make this easier for parents, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed a millstone app for parents.

 

Recent Headlines

App upgrades smartphone camera to capture heart health

Researchers from California Institute of Technology, Huntington Medical Research Institute and University of Southern California have developed a mobile application that uses a smartphone camera to noninvasively collect data on a patient’s heart health. Findings are published in The Journal of Critical Care Medicine.

Algorithm allows smartwatches to track all types of activity

Scientists from the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom have developed an algorithm enabling smartwatches to track every move without being programmed beforehand.

Telehealth offers potential to improve outcomes for anorexia treatment

Telehealth services could provide a feasible and effective platform for improving outcomes of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), according to a study published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Smartphone app uses 'selfies' to screen for pancreatic cancer

Researchers from the University of Washington have developed a smartphone application capable of screening for pancreatic cancer through taking a 'selfie.'

Mobile app improves blood sugar maintenance in diabetic patients

Type 1 and 2 diabetes patients using the One Drop mobile app were able to improve blood sugar control, according to a study published in JMIR Diabetes.

Mobile platform supports users in addiction recovery

Q2i, developers of patient engagement technologies, has announced Heywood Medical Group will be utilizing its Opioid Addiction Recovery Support (OARS) software to support patients with addiction recovery.

Tweets help health experts track opioid misuse

Monitoring use of social media platforms like Twitter can help researchers detecting misuse of opioid drugs in certain areas, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Toxicology.

Virtual visits as effective as in-person appointments for Parkinson’s patients

Virtual visits by neurologists save patients the hassle of travel, but some question such remote meetings as effective as in-person visits. A study published in Neurology examined the feasibility of virtual house calls by neurologist in treating those with Parkinson’s disease.

E-visits increase appointments made, reduce new patients seen

E-visits allow for patients and providers to come together without the travel or waiting room times, but whether these visits are as effective or have other benefits is unknown. In a study conducted by the Wisconsin School of Business, researchers found e-visits promote more appointments to primary care physicians.

Smartphone app improves concussion outcomes in teens

Smartphones and teenagers go hand-in-hand, but in the event of a concussion, patients are not advised to use mobile devices. In a report published in Brain Injury, researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center showed teenagers using a mobile health application once a day with medical care improved concussion symptoms.

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