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Mobile & Telehealth

 

Researchers from the Wisconsin Institute of Surgical Outcomes Research found a smartphone app to be a potential tool in detecting surgical site infections (SSI) and preventing additional hospital admissions. Findings were published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Telemonitoring can help manage patients with heart failure, but evaluating its true impact can be difficult. In response, researchers examined previous studies to establish criteria, which were divided into six classes: dimensions: clinical, economic, user perspective, educational, organizational, and technical. Findings were published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

A psychoeducational tool identifies patients at risk for an opioid overdose but fails to motivate them to change their behavior. Findings are published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

A telehealth-based weight loss program utilizing a health coach through video conferencing could result in loss of over 5 percent of initial body weight in six months. Findings are published in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare.

Communication between patient and physician is the foundation in building a close relationship—and cell phones have become the favored tool in clinical communication, according to a study published in European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare.

 

Recent Headlines

Cedars-Sinai launches Apple Watch app

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles has launched its application on the Apple Watch, making the hospital one of the few to offer an interactive app on the device.

80% of activity tracker users continue to utilize device for 6 months

Activity trackers aim to motivate users in exercising, but those who could benefit the most may not be able to utilize the technology. In a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania analyzed activity tracker engagement.

5 recommendations for improving mHealth utilization in clinical research

mHealth has the potential to improve precision medicine with applications and wearables to collect patient data at a low-cost, but the technology often goes underutilized. In a recent evaluation by the Duke University Margolis Center for Health Policy, researchers developed recommendations to improve mHealth use in clinical research.

Arizona's Care1st Health Plan launches Pacify mobile app for mothers on Medicaid

Care1st Health Plan of Arizona announced its Pacify mobile application program for Medicaid members who are expecting mothers or mothers within a year of giving birth.

Smartphone apps reduce depressive symptoms

Smartphone applications may be an effective treatment tool for millions of patients suffering from depression, according to a study published in World Psychiatry. The study examined the safety and effectiveness of mobile apps in patients with various forms of depression.

71% of hospitals allow 'BYOD' and 8 other findings

Bring your own device (BYOD) has become increasingly popular as technological security improves. Now, 71 percent of healthcare leaders allow BYOD in some form, according to a recent survey by Spok.

Telemedicine saves time, money for pediatric patients and families

Pediatric patients and their families using telemedicine for sports medicine appointments are able to save time and money, according to research to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition.

Google Glass app improves social skills of autistic children

Researchers have developed a prototype software application using Google Glass to deliver social-skill coaching to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Findings were published in Frontiers in Robotics and AI.

FDA approves marketing of mobile app for substance abuse

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the marketing of a mobile medical application for patients with substance use disorders (SUD). Used in conjunction with outpatient therapy, the app can help treat those with alcohol, cocaine and other SUDs. It is not intended for opioid dependence.

Telemonitoring improves CPAP adherence for those with sleep apnea

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are more likely to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when telemonitored and receiving personalized therapy adherence messages, according to a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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