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Mobile & Telehealth

 

Telemonitoring can help manage patients with heart failure, but evaluating its true impact can be difficult. In response, researchers examined previous studies to establish criteria, which were divided into six classes: dimensions: clinical, economic, user perspective, educational, organizational, and technical. Findings were published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

A psychoeducational tool identifies patients at risk for an opioid overdose but fails to motivate them to change their behavior. Findings are published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

A telehealth-based weight loss program utilizing a health coach through video conferencing could result in loss of over 5 percent of initial body weight in six months. Findings are published in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare.

Communication between patient and physician is the foundation in building a close relationship—and cell phones have become the favored tool in clinical communication, according to a study published in European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare.

The telestroke program implemented by Kaiser Permanente Northern California has shown an ability to reduce stroke patients' “door-to-needle” (DTN) time by 19.5 minutes, according to a study published in Stroke.

 

Recent Headlines

Huntington’s Disease Society, American Well partner to offer telehealth therapy

The Huntington’s Disease Society of America (HDSA) has partnered with American Well to offer free online therapy for patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). The partnership aims to improve the mental health of families dealing with the stress and emotional impact of HD.

mHealth helps patients lose weight, reduce blood pressure

As obesity rates continue to rise, researchers are searching for ways to assist people in managing their weight. A study published in JMIR examines how mobile health technology can help overweight patients manage the chronic disease with improved access to care at a low cost.

Diabetes monitoring wearable uses sweat to obtain results

Researchers at the University of Texas have developed a diagnostic wearable device capable of measuring three compounds related to diabetes through the sweat of the user. Findings were published in Scientific Reports.

Many patients interested in virtual visits

Telehealth is the future in accessing care, yet many physicians are hesitant to implement the technology. A survey conducted by Advisory Board found over 70 percent of respondents were interested in virtual doctor’s office visits. Researchers hope this survey, titled the “Virtual Visits Consumer Choice Survey,” will urge healthcare providers to embrace telehealth and incorporate it into their practices.

Designing wearables for the elderly could improve utilization

Wearable technology simplifies keeping up with a healthy life by providing information on cardiac health, illnesses and emergency alerts. While most users of wearables are younger, researchers believe the technology could reach its full potential for elderly patients who could benefit the most from multiple uses of the devices. In an article published in Ergonomics in Design, researchers outlined the framework for personalizing the wearable experience for older patients.

Put down the smartphone: constant use could cause carpal tunnel syndrome

Handheld electronic devices like smartphones and tablets have become an integral part of people’s lives but the cons of constantly holding onto these devices is unknown.

Telemedicine helps patients control diabetic symptoms

Rising level of diabetes in America have spurred The American Diabetes Association into action with the recommendation to healthcare organization to utilize team-based approaches to maximize care. With many primary care clinics lacking interprofessional teams, telemedicine is bringing the care to the patient. A study, published in NCMJ, evaluates the benefits telemedicine can bring to rural diabetic patients.

Mobile app gives parents a platform to securely track child’s health

Parents of the 500,000 children with complex medical needs are constantly juggling doctors’ appointments and prescriptions. A new health application, developed by Boston Children's Hospital's Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator (IDHA) with Duke Health System, aims at providing families with a single platform to securely share and track health data for their child’s care.

Smartphone app for cardiac arrest cuts emergency response time by three minutes

Time is of the essence when reaching someone experiencing cardiac arrest. Aiming to reach cardiac arrest patients quicker, researchers have developed a smartphone application capable of connecting first responders to cardiac arrest victims before emergency responders arrive.

Telemedicine as effective as in-person visit for headaches

Persistent headaches can require a visit to a neurologist, but long wait times and limited access prevents many patients from receiving attention. With telemedicine, patients are able to communicate with neurology specialists from their home. A study published in Neurology tests telemedicine in its ability to treat headache patients when compared to conventional visits.

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